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London Design Week Festival At The V&A: Installations

A design-lovers haven

Written by . Published on September 23rd 2011.


London Design Week Festival At The V&A: Installations

THIS year marks the city’s ninth London Design Festival, an it is the largest to date, with more than 200 partners and more than 280 events across the city, giving the public a whole multitude of experiences all this week. With so many events placed all over London the V&A’s design installations exhibition, seems like a good place to start, with works dotted around the whole museum. Although provided with a free catalogue and a map on a cute lanyard, the installations are extremely hard to locate immediately.

Curated by Giles Deacon and celebrating recent graduates new and best work, the group of designs ‘British-ish’ produced by the University of the Arts London’s newest Alumni presents unique and eclectic designs established within the British design education.

One of the first installations the viewer comes across will be, ‘Palindrome II’ by Peter Marigold, which is part of New York-based design gallerist and curator Murray Moss’s collaboration with the leader ‘Materialise’ in Belgium and their 3D printing. Using a series of unique works, created by using truly contemporary techniques and cutting-edge lasers and digital technologies to produce 3D objects, they are cleverly positioned to reference eight of the museum’s key exhibits and rooms. This group of work created using 3D printing was subheaded under the title ‘Industrial Revolution 2:0, How the material world will newly materialise’. Peter Marigolds creation in 2011 was produced with epoxy resin into castings in terracotta, concrete and jesmonite. The final product is stools that are part of a hybrid sculpture series, looking like giant hooves; the stools technique is undeniably more spectacular than aesthetically pleasing. Marigold provides the viewer with a work of design that uses classical and new processors to create a final product.

C Studio Bouroullec %26#38%3B V%26#38%3BA Images, Victoria And Albert Museum, Image 8

Another design within the 3D printing category is the ‘Escapism Dress’. London architect Daniel Widrig from Germany has collaborated with fashion designer Iris van Herpen from the Netherlands and Materialise in order to create a 3D printed dress. Printed on nylon, there are no seams, no sewing machines and no handwork employed when creating the dress. Presented in front of a eighteenth century Rococo chimney-breast built 250 years before. Giving insight into the different skills used in both designs, old and contemporary.

Curated by Giles Deacon and celebrating recent graduates new and best work, the group of designs ‘British-ish’ produced by the University of the Arts London’s newest Alumni presents unique and eclectic designs established within the British design education. ‘Captures Impact’ by Lauren Cardoe is a creation of movement stuck in time. The two jewellery type pieces capture the fluid motion of water exploding from balloons around the neck. Apparently to fleeting for the human eye, Cardoe concentrates the moment of explosion in wax, dye and thread and turns them into wearable forms and magical pieces.

C Studio Bouroullec %26#38%3B V%26#38%3BA Images, Victoria And Albert Museum, Image 5

The V&A’s installations, as part of the London Design Festival, use a number of interactive techniques to make the designs even more attractive to all ages. These being the ‘Beyond The Valley Presents’, a small group of designs and imagery linked to social networking sites, which persuades the viewer to transport their creation into the internet. Another extremely interesting interactive installation is the ‘Textile Field’, by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec, an expansive field in the famous Raphael Gallery.  The viewer is invited to lie back and take in the breathtaking huge images, including ‘The Sacrifice at Lystra’, created in 1515.

The London Design Festival runs from 17 – 25 September

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